Thursday, 15 December 2016

Material being marketed by ISIS

The DC US Attorney has just filed for forfeiture against four specific items found amongst ISIS files at near Deir Ezzor, Syria, they believe to be marketing towards the antiquities trade and collectors: https://www.justice.gov/usao-dc/pr/united-states-files-complaint-seeking-forfeiture-antiquities-associated-islamic-state

Specifically, the complaint alleges that the following items are subject to forfeiture:


Gold ring with carved gemstone (serpentine) 
This ring is believed to be from the Hellenistic/Roman period, dating approximately from 330 BC to 400 AD, and to have come from Deir Ezzor, Syria, which is near where the raid against Abu Sayyaf occurred. 



Gold coin featuring Antoninus Pius
This coin is believed to be Roman, dating to approximately 138-161 A.D., and is sourced to any large, urban Hellenistic or Roman city in Syria, including Apamea, Palmyra, Dura Europos, or Bosra. 




Gold coin featuring Emperor Hadrian Augustus Caesar
This coin is believed to be Roman, dating to approximately 125-128 AD, was probably minted in Rome, and is sourced to any large, urban Hellenistic or Roman city in Syria, including Apamea, Palmyra, Dura Europos, or Bosra. 




Carved Neo-Assyrian Stone
This is believed to be the upper portion of a round‐topped stone stela (upright stone slab bearing a relief design) carved with an image of a provincial official, most likely a eunuch, facing left, with his right forearm and hand raised. This item is believed to be from the archaeological site of Tell Ajaja in the Khabur region of northern Syria.

Neo-Assyrian Stone Stele

Inscription in cuneiform script to the god Samnuha.

Incident Typestolen Crime CategorysculptureMakerNeo-Assyrian Period859-824 B.C.Materialsstone



NB -             Because civil forfeitures are suits against the property itself, the complaint names the four above antiquities as the defendantsThe claims made in the complaint are only allegations and do not constitute a determination of liability.
            This case is being investigated by the FBI's Washington Field Office, with support from the U.S. Department of State. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Arvind K. Lal, Zia M. Faruqui, Deborah Curtis, Brian P. Hudak, Christopher B. Brown, and Ari Redbord, with the assistance of Paralegal Specialist Toni Donato, all from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia, are representing the government.
            The FBI reminds the public to come forward with any information they may have about stolen art or cultural heritage items. Tips can be submitted to tips.fbi.gov. Tipsters may remain anonymous.



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